Haitian Immigrants Line Up at U.S.-Mexican Border

Haitian Immigrants Line Up at U.S.-Mexican Border

A recent Associated Press article details the increasing crowds of Haitian immigrants developing at the U.S.-Mexico border. In recent months, Tijuana has been the unhappy gathering place for thousands of individuals hoping to enter the United States, despite the fact that U.S. immigration officials only allow a few dozen immigrants entrance to the country on a daily basis. With insufficient shelters available to house these Haitian individuals, many of whom have traveled 7,000 miles from Brazil and through eight other nations, only to sleep outside on sheets of cardboard. In response to this deluge of immigrants gravitating toward one of the busiest border crossings in the world, Mexican authorities have created an appointment system in hopes of curbing the unwanted traffic. Mexico has been granting 20-day permits to immigrants and helping them schedule appointments with U.S. immigration authorities, who can handle about 75 immigrants per day at San Ysidro. Some immigrants’ appointments are as far out as five weeks, which leaves them stranded in Tijuana until the date of their appointments, with little hope of staying indoors at one of Tijuana’s migrant shelters. On the other hand, the U.S. government, which previously had softened its stance on Haitian immigrants following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, now has begun detaining these individuals, rather than releasing them on humanitarian parole. Once the Haitians have left Mexico, U.S. officials cannot return them to Mexico; instead, they detain the immigrants in hopes of eventually returning them to their native country. Nonetheless, Haiti has been slow to take back these deportees, largely due to its poverty-stricken nature; in fiscal year 2015, Haiti accepted only 433 deportees from the U.S. This flood of immigrants has largely come from Brazil, which welcomed the Haitians after the devastation of the earthquake. However, the rapidly developing economic problems that have plagued Brazil over the past several years have caused the Haitian immigrants to seek work in the United States. As a result, roughly 5,000 Haitians have arrived in Tijuana since October, 2015, with rumors of 40,000 more Haitians making their way to the popular U.S.-Mexico border crossing. Mexican authorities estimate that about 300 Haitians and Africans, on average, are crossing Mexico’s southern border each day. Thousands more immigrants are stranded at the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. All of the Haitian immigrants who enter the U.S. are potentially at risk of deportation, unless they can raise a sufficient defense. Contacting an experienced California immigration attorney as quickly as possible can be essential to combatting deportation proceedings that the government has brought against you. Taking steps to resolve a potential deportation problem from the outset is often much simpler than waiting until the last minute and trying to fix the situation. Call Landerholm Immigration, A.P.C., at (510) 756-4468, today, and learn what we can do to help you through this situation.
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